It is easy to grow potatoes. If you have limited space you can grow them in a dustbin or pots on a terrace. If you are growing potatoes in garden then its better if the ground is manure the previous autumn.

Potatoes can be grown in varieties of soils however, you should remove the scab if your soil is on the acid side of neutral and if water availability is regular. Water is important as the young tubers are developing.

Although you can plant shop-grown potatoes as mother plants, certified seed potatoes are virus- and disease-free, so they produce a higher yield.

Chitting is advisable before planting – it speeds up establishment. It involves placing the seed potato end up in an egg box on a cool, bright windowsill to form “eyes” no more than a couple of centimetres long.

A 30cm spacing between tubers is optimal, with rows 60cm apart, but wider spacing in the row produces a bigger potato, so the earlies are best planted closer for salad potatoes, and the maincrops, which you might save for wintry jacket potatoes and mash, can be spaced 45cm apart.

As soon as the growth emerges above ground, you can start the “earthing up” process to keep the tubers from greening when exposed to light. Harvest can start as soon as you see the flowers opening.

There exists more than 400 varieties of potatoes and you may have unlimited choices.

You need to take care of any infection while growing potatoes. Blight is a fungus, Phytophthora infestans, and it needs high humidity and mild temperatures day and night to grow on potato plants. You should remove the foliage as soon as the infection is visible.

You should prefer growing high yielding and blight resistant varieties and some of the common varieties include “

It is easy to grow potatoes. If you have limited space you can grow them in a dustbin or pots on a terrace. If you are growing potatoes in garden then its better if the ground is manure the previous autumn.

Potatoes can be grown in varieties of soils however, you should remove the scab if your soil is on the acid side of neutral and if water availability is regular. Water is important as the young tubers are developing.

Although you can plant shop-grown potatoes as mother plants, certified seed potatoes are virus- and disease-free, so they produce a higher yield.

Chitting is advisable before planting – it speeds up establishment. It involves placing the seed potato end up in an egg box on a cool, bright windowsill to form “eyes” no more than a couple of centimetres long.

A 30cm spacing between tubers is optimal, with rows 60cm apart, but wider spacing in the row produces a bigger potato, so the earlies are best planted closer for salad potatoes, and the maincrops, which you might save for wintry jacket potatoes and mash, can be spaced 45cm apart.

As soon as the growth emerges above ground, you can start the “earthing up” process to keep the tubers from greening when exposed to light. Harvest can start as soon as you see the flowers opening.

There exists more than 400 varieties of potatoes and you may have unlimited choices.

You need to take care of any infection while growing potatoes. Blight is a fungus, Phytophthora infestans, and it needs high humidity and mild temperatures day and night to grow on potato plants. You should remove the foliage as soon as the infection is visible.

You should prefer growing high yielding and blight resistant varieties and some of the common varieties include “Orla” (first early), “Belle de Fontenay”, “Edzell Blue” (second early), “Lady Christl” , “Shetland Black”, “Pink Fir Apple”, “Ratte” , and “Sarpo Mira”.

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